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Cat | Scottish | 22 | collects fandoms | overly invested in fictional people.

Always willing to talk, whether it's for a chat or you just need someone to listen.

Just drop me a line :)

currently watching: power rangers

all liveblogging tagged with 'power rangers for ts' for blacklisting purposes


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42
Posted 1 week ago with 318 notes
digi-egg / mosymoseys
Posted 1 week ago with 9,438 notes
droidbait / powerrangers20
hairbylizzy:

Current rainbow from the back. 

hairbylizzy:

Current rainbow from the back. 

Posted 1 week ago with 2,062 notes
hairbylizzy / comebackallie
Posted 1 week ago with 576 notes
powerrangers20 / powerrangers20
"but what a lot of parents don’t realize is that when they’re openly worrying about bills within earshot of their children, the kids worry, too. when they hit a certain age, they start to make sacrifices on the family’s behalf, and they feel guilt for the rare small luxuries they’re allowed."
The 5 Stupidest Habits You Develop Growing Up Poor | Cracked.com (via devilsbreath)
Posted 1 week ago with 90,842 notes
nanner / oliverceleron
Posted 1 week ago with 11,365 notes
itsbrooklyn99 / canistakahari
dreamwithsilverlining:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 
Everyone else go home

Guys I’ve got a story too
I play the flute, and we all know that flutes aren’t exactly notorious for playing loud. Everyone in our section has been playing for a while, and can blast out notes at a pretty good volume if we have to, but in comparison, it’s nothing compared to what sections like the saxes and the trumpets can do.
Last year, we got a new piece, and what do you know, there was a ffff. We already knew it wasn’t going to end well but we decided to give it out best shot. The note happened to be a high high F (think four lines above the staff) which was just a recipe for disaster.
The rest of the piece was relatively easy and the oncoming train wreck of a note was a ways down the page, and the song was going smoothly right until we got to it. We had a few beats of rest right before it, and we all took the deepest breaths that our lungs could physically hold, closed our eyes in fear, and blew into our flutes so hard that our heads felt like they were going to fall off.
I didn’t even know that a flute was capable of MAKING the sound that our section made that day. You think clarinet squeaks are bad? Oh no, friends, this noise made clarinet squeaks sound like the chirping of birds on a sunny day. The entire band stopped in horror, and our director stated at us in silence for ten seconds before laughing so hard she practically fell off of her chair, and managed to wheeze out “just play it forte next time”.

dreamwithsilverlining:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Guys I’ve got a story too

I play the flute, and we all know that flutes aren’t exactly notorious for playing loud. Everyone in our section has been playing for a while, and can blast out notes at a pretty good volume if we have to, but in comparison, it’s nothing compared to what sections like the saxes and the trumpets can do.

Last year, we got a new piece, and what do you know, there was a ffff. We already knew it wasn’t going to end well but we decided to give it out best shot. The note happened to be a high high F (think four lines above the staff) which was just a recipe for disaster.

The rest of the piece was relatively easy and the oncoming train wreck of a note was a ways down the page, and the song was going smoothly right until we got to it. We had a few beats of rest right before it, and we all took the deepest breaths that our lungs could physically hold, closed our eyes in fear, and blew into our flutes so hard that our heads felt like they were going to fall off.

I didn’t even know that a flute was capable of MAKING the sound that our section made that day. You think clarinet squeaks are bad? Oh no, friends, this noise made clarinet squeaks sound like the chirping of birds on a sunny day. The entire band stopped in horror, and our director stated at us in silence for ten seconds before laughing so hard she practically fell off of her chair, and managed to wheeze out “just play it forte next time”.

slickricklj:

Tanya bailing Adam out of trouble.

Posted 1 week ago with 128 notes
slickricklj / slickricklj
Posted 1 week ago with 128 notes
kathrynerbearchive / snowdarkred
http://scydiaas.tumblr.com/post/76263011223/taliaitscoldoutside-tips-for-respecting

comebackallie:

 

taliaitscoldoutside:

Tips for respecting children’s spaces, competence, and general existence from a preschool teacher:

  • Listen to them
  • Ask them, “Do you want to say hi to your auntie/grandma/cousin/dad/whatevs” (Hint: they will be honest and this can result in a simple hello or a hug or a silly “No!” depending how comfortable they feel)
  • If they don’t want to hug you realize it’s not that they don’t love you it’s that they don’t know you/don’t feel like hugging.
  • Just like every other person who doesn’t want a hug
  • In the event that you need to move a child EXPLAIN TO THEM WHY and WHAT YOU ARE DOING don’t just move them like PROPS they are CHILDREN and NOT props
  • For instance, “I’m going to move your chair over so we have room at the table for everyone!”
  • Or  “Sorry there was a person running by I didn’t want you to get smushed so I had to pick you up!”
  • Remind them that they are people not objects using your actions
  • Asking children to do something they don’t want to do but NEED to do often doesn’t work, instead give them a choice, “Do you want to eat bok choy or yams?”
  • NOT “Do you want to eat your vegetables?”
  • "Do you want to brush your teeth in the bathroom or the kitchen"
  • This exercises their ever-growing free will and is especially useful during TERRIFIC TWOS okay TERRIFIC not TERRIBLE they’re TERRIFIC
  • Children will copy you, MODEL FOR THEM
  • Being over enthusiastic IS beneficial for them understanding emotional and social competence
  • "I hung this picture uneven, that makes me sad, hmmm! Oh goodie, I found my mistake! Now I can fix it, I’ll feel much happier when I’ve fixed it!"
  • You think it sounds ridic yeah well hearing you do that children around you just learned to not get so discouraged by their mistakes and that it’s okay to try to fix them
  • ADULTS CAN APOLOGIZE TO CHILDREN
  • You make a mistake that hurt a child, APOLOGIZE and show them how to do it properly and genuinely
  • Realize children are fully competent and are capable of making meanings from YOUR implications about race, culture, gender, ability, sexuality, EVERYTHING
  • Many three year olds know what the N-word is, what gay means, can identify which children are visably disabled, and YOUR REACTIONS of their answers of questions about their culture
  • Children like to talk about themselves so do not ever dismiss what they say about themselves as illegitimate just because it sounds silly or unlikely sometimes it’s true
  • Stop talking about how you hate children, just leave them alone if you don’t understand them you don’t have to be complete jerks to PEOPLE you’ve never met
  • I will post more and if people have question PLS ASK ME I WOULD LOVE TO ANSWER WHAT I KNOW
Posted 1 week ago with 19,494 notes
taliaitscoldoutside / comebackallie